I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`

Then go to your Dropbox, (Google Drive, OneDrive, OwnCloud, Whatever) folder and make a bare git repository:

``I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`

Then go to your Dropbox, (Google Drive, OneDrive, OwnCloud, Whatever) folder and make a bare git repository:

``

Now go back to your git project and make the origin to push to:

```I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`

Then go to your Dropbox, (Google Drive, OneDrive, OwnCloud, Whatever) folder and make a bare git repository:

``I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`I wanted to get a central git repo that was backed up in the cloud, but keep my code in it’s own folder outside of the synced folder. I found you can use a Dropbox or other file sync service as a central git repository by making a new bare repo and then using that as the origin.

Make your normal git repository:

`

Then go to your Dropbox, (Google Drive, OneDrive, OwnCloud, Whatever) folder and make a bare git repository:

``

Now go back to your git project and make the origin to push to:

```